Молекулярная гастрономия для креативных шеф-поваров (англ. язык) - страница 110

Молекулярная гастрономия для креативных шеф-поваров (англ. язык)

concentrated in the cooking liquid.

Boiling:

During boiling, coagulated proteins that have dissolved off the meat may clump together on the

surface of the cooking liquid, where they may form a scum.

The disadvantages: However, cooking in water has two major disadvantages:

· because the temperature of water never exceeds 100 C, the desired flavour producing

Maillard reactions can not occur. Boiled meat therefore looks and tastes rather plain. The

flavour of boiled meats is determined only by the simple breakdown products of proteins and

fats, which are not as flavoursome as the Maillard reaction products.

· additionally, flavour will be lost as some of these molecules move from the meat to the

cooking water by diffusion. Water soluble mineral salts and melted fat may also move into the

cooking water. The longer the meat is cooked, the more flavour is transferred from the meat to

the cooking liquid, and the more the taste of the meat is reduced. The movement of all these

substances into the cooking water can be preventing by flavouring the cooking liquid before

the meat to be cooked is added. For example, salt to the cooking water reduces the number of

mineral salts that move into the cooking water, allowing the meat to keep more of its taste.

Alternatively, in order to not waste all the strong flavours that have moved into the cooking

water, the flavoursome cooking liquid is often boiled down and reduced to concentrate the...

moved into the cooking

water, the flavoursome cooking liquid is often boiled down and reduced to concentrate the

flavours, and then this liquid is then served with the meat. (The meat is usually removed from

the liquid before the liquid is reduced to prevent overcooking and drying out the meat that

might otherwise occur at boiling temperatures). Alternatively, the meat is allowed to cool in the

cooking liquid itself – as meat cools it actually reabsorbs some of its lost liquid. The cooking

liquid can accumulate between the fibres of the separated collagen network, and will therefore

add back some of the lost taste.

Making stock: Some particularly tough collagen rich pieces of meat will need to be cooked in the liquid

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